Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The Murder of Temrin (The Burrower Wars Part II)



Many believed that the Long Winter was a punishment by the Gods for allowing the Dark Races to gain dominance during the Cthonic age. As the Ice Age came to an end, Humans, Brute Men and Dwarves stumbled clumsily around in the Melting Lands.

Most sought away from the Ice as it reminded them of all of those who had frozen to death. Keres, Shaman of the Qullan Tribe, saw it differently. Unlike his tribesmen, he did not fear death. Instead he was drawn to it. His anger was against those Gods who had taken power from the world. He believed that some of that ancient power was still buried beneath the ice. Keres was right.

As the Glaciers began to melt, some of the things hidden beneath the ice once again resurfaced. The object Keres discovered in the Ice was nothing less than an artifact from the Cthonic Age. Charged with its immense power, Keres began to form his plan.

Travelling to the highest mountain peak, Keres came upon the Throne of the Gods. There he fasted and prayed until Temrin, God of Time heard his prayers. Keres told Temrin of the artifact he had found. The Shaman told the God that he would show him this artifact if he came with him to the place where he had hidden it. Temrin accompanied the Shaman suspecting no threat from a mere mortal.

Once they were back in his lair, Keres made sure that Temrin had stepped into the circle of blood that the Shaman had drawn on the ground. When Keres produced the artifact, Temrin was eager to see this discovery from a past age. He was taken by surprise, when Keres drove the weapon right through the God. Power flowed from the dying God into Keres' body. The God of Time was dead.




Behind the Curtains:

  • Temrin and his death were first mentioned in Dave Arneson's Blackmoor D20 Campaign Setting.
  • The Throne of the Gods was first mentioned in the First Fantasy Campaign (JG) by Dave Arneson.
  • The Cthonic Age was first mentioned in Dungeons of Castle Blackmoor





-Havard


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